Technologist

Office tech is my primary offline business, but I'm interested in anything high tech.

Dosecast CloudSync Disappoints

Dosecast CloudSync Disappoints

Since I posted on Managaing Medications in iOS three months ago, my choice of app in this category—Dosecast—has been updated to version 9. Do the latest changes to the app merit a bump in a major version number? Not in my book.

I already wasn’t excited by the design of Dosecast. Ever used a Mac app that has been ported from Windows and been disappointed that it just doesn’t feel right? That’s how I feel with Dosecast.

A Habit App for Every Day of the Week

A Habit App for Every Day of the Week

In 2015, I, like many of you, made some New Year’s resolutions, fully expecting them not to last. So far, though, they’re holding up pretty well, thanks to a handful of apps I’ve been trying out on my iPhone.

While catching up on Mike Vardy’s new Productivityist podcast, I was introduced to several new-to-me apps and decided that this would be a good time to put them (and some others) through their paces.

Two Years with Line2

Line2: Great service, less-than-great app

I’ve come to the end of two years with Line2, a cloud phone service that has replaced my business landline, and overall I’ve been pleased with the service. However, there are a number of niggling things with the iOS app itself which keep me from fully enjoying the service and which the company is slow—or unwilling—to fix.

The biggest issue for me is that there is no alert/banner or sound for new voicemail messages.

Monitor an App's Internet Usage

Monitor an App's Internet Usage

Every once in a while I want to watch how an app is connecting to the Internet from my Mac, but outside of using Little Snitch’s network monitor I’ve not been quite sure how to do that. Today I was introduced to lsof, a Terminal command to list open files. After reading the manual (man lsof) I found this syntax to work very well for me:

lsof -a -i -c Dropbox

The “-a” ANDs the next two options—without it, the following options would be ORed.

Daylite Status Board Panels

Daylite Status Board Panels

Last week’s release of Status Board [iOS; $10] brought a flurry of activity on all fronts as users came up with a bevy of ways to use the iPad dashboard app to consolidate and display disparate sets of data. Within days someone asked about Daylite integration and so–without further ado–I’m pleased to announce the availability of Daylite Status Board Panels!

Facebook's Mission

Facebook's Mission

At this week’s Facebook Home announcement, Mark Zuckerberg quoted the company’s mission statement:

Give people the power to share and make the world more open and connected.

Zuckerberg then went on to explain “‘Open’ means having access to information… ‘Connected’ means having access to people…”

Date Formats in Daylite 4 Reports

Date Formats in Daylite 4 Reports

As I was creating a report in Daylite today, I was attempting to format a date and I got some, well, interesting results as I tried different formatting strings. It quickly became clear that Daylite 4 doesn’t use the same NSCalendarDate formats that Billings uses. And as I began to map the symbols myself it appeared that there was overlap between some symbols while some formats seemed to be missing.

Dealing with the iCloud Junk Mailbox

Dealing with the iCloud Junk Mailbox

One of iCloud’s annoying features is its server-side spam filtering. Besides the utterly opaque side of the filtering, where it may simply refuse to deliver a message to a recipient based on the content, there’s the side that delivers other messages it judges to be spam to your Junk mailbox.

Installing arpReach

Installing arpReach
I have just gotten around to installing the new arpReach for myself; although it’s been out for about 9 months, I’ve only installed it for clients. This was a fresh install; I still need to upgrade some installations from ARP3 and the time involved in doing that is the main reason I’ve put this off.

The Silly Verizon Privacy Brouhaha


As a new Verizon customer I was somewhat concerned when Ben Brooks and others warned of the telecom company selling your web history and device location. After looking into it, I think the issue is overblown.

Here’s what Verizon is using and how they’re using it: